Herpes Dating Advice Sign Up

STD Dating Australia

There are more and more singles with herpes, HIV, HPV and other STDs in Australia. Most men and women who have sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) from working in the sex industry and ACT law prohibits the sexual services, The latest statistics on sexually transmitted diseases released at the Australiasian Sexual Health Conference in Darwin show a record number of 82,000 Australians had a positive chlamydia test last year. This is the largest number of cases ever recorded and makes the sexually transmitted disease the most notified infection or disease of any kind in Australia. So people who got HIV, Herpes, HPV or any other STDs feel lonely because they worry about being rejected or discriminated from his friends or family. 

PositiveSinglesAustralia.com.au is the first warm-hearted and exclusive community for singles and friends with STDs in Australia, we will help these people who got STDs find singles and friends with STDs. Whether you are looking for Herpes dating, HPV dating, HIV AIDS dating, or any other STD dating. All personal information will be anonymous and private. You do not have to provide your information to anyone until you want to take things further. Everyone with an STD can join us regardless of religion, sexual orientation or gender. Never feel lonely again!

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that can infect the prostate, urethra and testes in men and the cervix, uterus and pelvis in women. Chlamydia is largely asymptomatic; most people are unaware that they have the infection and that they need treatment. If left untreated, chlamydia can cause serious complications. In men, chlamydia may lead to inflammation of the upper genital tract and infertility. In women, untreated chlamydia can result in pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause ectopic pregnancies, chronic pelvic pain and infertility. Chlamydia also increases the possibility of contracting other infections, such as HIV, as it can initiate an immune response that makes the transmission of HIV more likely.  Treatment for chlamydia is usually straightforward and involves a course of antibiotics.

In 2011, chlamydia was the most frequently reported notifiable condition in Australia, with 79,833 new notifications for persons aged 15 years and over, or 435 cases per 100,000 population. This was nearly seven times the rate of the next most frequently reported notifiable STI, gonorrhoea. This rate has more than tripled over the past decade, increasing from 130 notifications per 100,000 in 2001.

CHLAMYDIA NOTIFICATIONS BY AGE - 2011(a)
Footnote(s): (a) Per 100,000 population aged 15 years and over.
Source(s): National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System ; ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2011 (cat. no. 3101.0)

In 2011, more women than men were diagnosed with chlamydia, with 46,636 women aged 15 years and over diagnosed with the infection, compared with 33,197 men aged 15 years and over. Women aged between 15 and 19 years had the highest rates of diagnosis in 2011, with 2,228 per 100,000 receiving a positive diagnosis, while men aged between 20 and 24 years had the highest rate, with 1,423 per 100,000. Overall, chlamydia diagnosis for men and women aged between 15 and 29 years accounted for 82% of diagnoses for the whole population.

While chlamydia notifications were more common in women than men in the younger age ranges, from the age of 30, the reverse was true. 

For both women and men, the rates of diagnosis for chlamydia have increased considerably over the past 10 years. Overall, the rate for women aged 15 years and over has more than tripled, from 152 per 100,000 in 2001, to 502 per 100,000 in 2011. The rate for men aged 15 years and over has also more than tripled, from 106 per 100,000 in 2001, to 366 per 100,000 in 2011. 

The largest increases were for women and men aged 15-19 years. For women aged 15-19 years, the notification rate increased from 569 per 100,000 in 2001, to 2,228 per 100,000 in 2011. For men, the rate increased nearly five times, from 150 per 100,000 in 2001, to 714 per 100,000 in 2011.

GONORRHOEA NOTIFICATIONS, AUSTRALIA - 2011-2011

Footnote(s): (a) Per 100,000 population aged 15 years and over.
Source(s): National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System; ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2011 (cat. no. 3101.0)

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea is a bacterial infection with similar characteristics to chlamydia. Like chlamydia, gonorrhoea infects reproductive organs, can be asymptomatic and increases the chances of contracting other infections. If left untreated, gonorrhoea can also cause infertility in men and women. While antibiotics can cure gonorrhoea, drug-resistant strains are increasing in many parts of the world and successful treatment is becoming more difficult. 

Notification rates of gonorrhoea have generally increased over the past 10 years. In 2011, the national notification rate for people aged 15 years and over was 65 per 100,000 population, up from 40 per 100,000 in 2001. 

GONORRHOEA NOTIFICATIONS BY AGE - 2011(a)

Footnote(s): Per 100,000 population aged 15 years and over.
Source(s): National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System; ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2011 (cat. no. 3101.0)

In contrast with chlamydia, more men than women were diagnosed with gonorrhoea in 2011: 8,056 men, compared with 3,789 women. Men aged 20-24 years had the highest diagnosis rate, with 213 diagnoses per 100,000, followed by 185 per 100,000 for those aged 25-29 years. For women, the highest rates of diagnosis were in the youngest age groups, with 178 and 128 diagnosed per 100,000 for those aged 15-19 years and 20-24 years respectively. Men and women aged between 15 and 34 years accounted for nearly three quarters (74%) of total gonorrhoea diagnosis.

For both men and women, the rate of diagnosis has increased over the past 10 years, particularly amongst people aged 45 years and over. For men aged 45-49 years, the rate more than doubled between 2001 and 2011, from 25 per 100,000 to 66 per 100,000. Women of the same age range experienced a similar increase, from 3.4 per 100,000 to 8.6 per 100,000. 

SYPHILIS NOTIFICATIONS, AUSTRALIA - 2004-2011(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Per 100,000 population aged 15 years and over.
Source(s): National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System; ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2011 (cat. no. 3101.0)

Syphilis

Syphilis is a highly infectious bacterial disease, which can cause sores on the infected persons genitals, cervix and mouth. It can arise up to 10 years after the original infection, and if left untreated, can cause serious, irreversible damage to the brain, spinal cord and other organs.  Syphilis typically consists of three stages: primary, secondary and the late/latent stage. In the primary and secondary stages, syphilis is highly contagious and can be asymptomatic, allowing the spread of the disease as well as its undetected progression to the latent stage. It is in the latent stage that serious complications can arise.

Syphilis is rare in Australia. However, rates are increasing in some communities, including men who have sex with men and people with HIV/AIDS. While syphilis responds to penicillin, if not treated it becomes a chronic disease with a variable course and long periods of latency.

In 2011, there were 1,233 new cases of syphilis which had been diagnosed within two years of contracting the infection. After peaking at 8.3 diagnoses per 100,000 population in 2007, the number of diagnoses declined to 6.2 per 100,000 in 2010. 

SYPHILIS NOTIFICATIONS BY AGE - 2011(a)

Footnote(s): (a) Per 100,000 population aged 15 years and over.
Source(s): National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System; ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, September 2011 (cat. no. 3101.0)

In 2011, men aged 15 years and over had a rate of diagnosis seven times as high as women aged 15 years and over, with 12 per 100,000 men diagnosed, compared with 1.7 per 100,000 women.

For men, the age group most affected was the 40-44 year age group, with 23 per 100,000 diagnosed. The pattern of diagnosis for men with syphilis was different from other bacterial STIs, as middle aged men were the most likely to be diagnosed with syphilis.

Women aged 15-19 years had a rate of diagnosis of 5.7 per 100,000, followed by 20-24 years, with 4.6 per 100,000. The notification rate for women aged 15-19 years exceeded that of men (5.7 women per 100,000, compared with 5.0 men per 100,000) and was the only age group to do so.

Between 2004 and 2011, the rate of syphilis diagnosis increased for men in every age group. The most dramatic increases were for those aged 45-49 years (200%) and 55-59 years (206%). For women, the rate of diagnosis for each age group either declined or remained steady, with only three age groups showing increases: the 15-19 years age group increased by 60%, 35-39 years increased by 84% and 45-49 years increased by 129%.